When I used to believe

There was a time when Andrew Pyrka believed. He believed that aliens made crop circles. No shame or crime in that. In fact, I remember pictures of a fresh faced Andrew Pyrka on one of Gary King’s tours. Ah, the good old days.

Whilst rummaging around the internet I came across this article/story Andrew wrote for the Crop Circle Connector. One of the jump-out lines is the following:

“On my dashboard I always leave on display Lucy Pringles Pitkin Guide to Crop Circles and I have three stems of corn dangling from my interior mirror. This attracts attention to the curious mind and generally a conversation begins about the crop circle phenomenon,”

I wonder whose book is on the dashboard these days?

Anyway, Andrew goes on:

It wasn’t long before the question came, “What’s with the corn driver?”. As always I go into the crop circle tour guide mode and start to real of  memorized script of words.

Again, Andrew identifies as the believer and the guide.

So the long and the short of it, a couple had an experience, they got in the back of Andrew’s taxi, and as luck would have it the guy gave Andrew a typed story of what happened to them. It is an amazing tale, including the prediction of : One more thing on August 13th this year [2009], there will be a crop formation of importance”.

The full story can be found here. It is worth reading.

It is interesting as the story infers that crop circles were made by advanced technological means. The guy witnesses a strange object which he later discovers was close to the tip of a crop circle when witnessed, inferring the object made the crop circle. I don’t believe this story is true in the slightest (in the sense that Andrew met a couple who just happened to have such as story to deliver to the first interested party. There would have been more high-profile researchers that the couple certainly would have been aware of after living in Wiltshire for 15 years (as the story claims) they could have turned to).

I highlight this story as it indicates that people believe certain things and have a journey which may lead them to somewhere very different from where their beliefs first originated. This certainly is a journey Andrew took himself but since his conversion to the ‘it’s all a great con’, Andrew finds himself as the messiah, trying to tell the world of his discoveries. Sadly these discoveries were highlighted by many others long before his arrival on the scene. Certainly they put their discoveries over in a more nuanced and less divisive fashion. Andrew misses the point that it is all about the journey and not the destination, something which might be true of the crop circle world but Andrew doesn’t want to hear that. Or rather he doesn’t want people to make that realisation for themselves, no, he must tell them “the truth” whether they asked for it or not.

But clearly Andrew feels slighted by all of this and continues to rail against those who he feels wronged him: The evil cabal of crop circle researchers and photographers. Why Andrew just can’t let the people have their own journeys to their truth is beyond me. Nothing worse than someone telling you what they believe is the truth and now you should believe it too. Because isn’t that what the pro-ET researcher do?

Most researchers have moved onto a less reductionist approach. It’s kind of sad as I am sure Andrew could plow his energies into something more constructive in his life and the lives of his immediate family. Holding onto grudges and always looking for online arguments must be a little tiring and repetitive. Life’s too short.

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